Everybody argues. But whether it’s with your coworker, your neighbor or your boss – you HAVE to know how to fight fair. Because if you don’t, you can lose a lot more than just your dignity.

 

So, here are some tips on how to disagree with the important people in your life. We got these from Real Simple magazine.

 

First: Your boss……Maybe you’re being overlooked for a promotion, or you don’t like where your cubicle’s located. Whether the problem is big or small, your financial security could depend on your ability to get along with this person……So, according to workplace consultant Jennell Evans, start the conversation by saying something positive - like, “You know how much I value your leadership, and I want to speak openly with you about this.” Then make your point concisely – no rambling. And finally, end the conversation as respectfully as you started. Thank them for listening. This is the best approach to get them to see things your way.

 

Next: Disagreeing with your neighbor……Their barking dog, the beat up car in the driveway that’s an eyesore……Keep in mind that this person shares your property line, probably your most valuable asset. So, being civil is KEY.

    

When complaining, always give them a graceful way out. For example, “You probably don’t realize this, but when your dog starts barking at 5:00 am, it disturbs my sleep.” Then emphasize that if the situation were reversed, you’d want to help them in any way you could.

 

And a final tip on disagreeing: When dealing with a coworker, remember: Your ability to get things done almost always depends on other people. That’s the word from Rebecca Zucker, co-founder of Next Step Partners, a leadership-development firm. She says disagreeing in a manner that offends people can really hurt your career. So, rather than argue, say “I see your perspective, but...” and then state your case. If a coworker feels that you’ve REALLY listened, they’re more likely to work with you to come up with the best possible solution – whether it’s yours, theirs, or a little of both.