Parents: If your teen received a text message that said: “Scored 420. CUL8R,” would you know what that means? According to a report we found on CNN, it’s an invitation to get high – literally – by smoking pot. That’s the word from Ryan Jones, a text messaging expert who runs the Website NoSlang.com. It’s sort of an online dictionary, where parents can find the secret meanings behind thousands of slang terms used in online chat rooms, instant messages, and cell phone text messages. Jones says he’s made it his mission to educate parents about these terms, because texting is the standard way teens communicate with one another these days. Unfortunately, some of the words they’re typing to each other may actually be code words for dangerous activities – like using drugs and alcohol, or having sex!

For example: Most people know that “lol” means “laugh out loud.” You may not know that texting the number “420,” is a common reference for pot. So is texting a number sign followed by a bunch of “Z”s (#ZZZZZZZZZ). Jones says that’s a creative way for teens to type something that looks like a joint onscreen! Also, the number “2,” followed by the letters “C” and “B” is a text reference for using a type of psychedelic drug. The number “6” is a common slang reference for “sex.” So, a message with the letters “C” and “U,” followed by the numbers “4” and “6,” simply means: “see you for sex.”

According to a recent survey, 64% of parents said they routinely monitor their teen’s electronic communications, but monitoring won’t do any good unless you understand what those messages mean. So, to help you translate the latest teen lingo, we recommend using one of these three Websites: NoSlang.com, TeenChatDecoder.com, or NetSmartz411.org.